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Homestead Farms
3701 Highway EE
Owensville, Missouri  65066
Phone or Fax:
573-437-4277
Toll Free:
888-314-3148
E-mail: ronv@fidnet.com
printable_order_form

Hosta A-B
Hosta C-E
Hosta F-G
Hosta H-K
Hosta L-N
Hosta O-R
Hosta S
Hosta T-Z

Go to Hosta Glossary

We ship container grown hostas of good size with strong root systems. WE NEVER SEND TISSUE CULTURES. The tissue cultured hostas we receive are grown for a minimum of one full growing season, many times two to three seasons before they are sold to our customers. Hostas are shipped from March thru November.

Hostas come in many sizes (miniature to giant), shapes, textures, and colors. When considering color here are some suggestions:
In choosing green hostas, keep in mind that green shades blend well with all other colors and are considered a 'cool' color. You'll find greens with leaves that are shiny, powdery, light and dark green, round, lance shaped, heart shaped, oval, etc.


Hosta 'Empress Wu'
Photo courtesy of Skaggs


Hosta 'Blue Angel'        

The blue hostas are also considered as 'cool shades' and are easy to blend with most any color. They add a good contrast when placed next to yellow hostas. To hold their deep blue color they need to be planted in shady areas. A blue hosta planted in a sunny area will tend to turn green by late summer.

Yellow to gold shades will really brighten up a dark area of your garden. In fact it will draw your garden visitor's eye to that spot. Don't overdo the use of yellow though as too many seem to clutter up and confuse an otherwise beautiful garden. The yellow cultivars blend in well with all colors especially the blues and gold margined types.


Hosta 'Stained Glass'


Hosta 'Ivory Coast'         

Both the gold and white margined hostas produce variety when planted with the solid colors. The combinations and patterns of the variegated types planted with solid colors are subject to no limitations.
Finally we have a grouping with unique variegations such as leaves with dark margins and lighter centers, or those with variegations in the spring turning to solid green by summer.


Hosta 'High Society'

Additional tips for selecting the right hosta for your garden.


Hosta Glossary

Cordate Heart shaped
Diffuse Spreading widely
Floriferous Blooming freely
Glaucous Whitened with minute powder
Hybrid The offspring resulting from crossing two genetically different parental forms
Lanceolate Lance shaped
Melting out Scorching appears and then a hole through the leaf on some Hostas having large areas of white variegation
Oblique Slanting away from the vertical, used primarily for flower scapes
Opaque Dull, the reverse of shiny
Ovate Egg-shaped, broad end at base
Petiole The leaf stem
Pruinose A frosted, dewy appearance
Rugose Any leaf surface with an uneven surface feature including wrinkled, puckered, crinkled, ruffled, dimpled and embossed
Scape The stem bearing the flowers
Stoloniferous A root stock which sends out horizontal stems from which new independent plants arise
Undulate Wavy, either the leaf margin or the leaf is wavy
Viridescent Turning green

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Tips for selecting the right Hosta for your garden

  • The use of blue hostas next to light yellow hostas adds contrast.
  • Planting one specimen hosta in an unexpected site provides a unique touch.
  • "Warm" colors, such as gold and yellows are thought of as coming forward, while "cool" colors such as green and blue recede. Thereby, placing yellow and gold cultivars in front of blue hostas create an illusion of greater depth.
  • Yellow hostas are used to brighten up a dark corner or area of your garden. They are used to draw the visitor's attention to that spot.
  • Hostas can solve that bare spot or eyesore in the shady part of your yard or next to the deck that gets very little sun.
  • The use of bolder variegated hostas at the back of the garden seem to bring that area closer.
  • Hostas offer continuity to the garden by being planted with and among ferns, Siberian iris, astilbe, etc.
  • Hostas perform better (more pest resistant and sun tolerant) and become more beautiful each year.
  • Hostas make great container plants placed on the patio.
  • Place deeply variegated and highly fragrant hostas close to the viewer so that they can appreciate those characteristics more acutely.
  • Generally, hostas grown in shade have fewer but larger leaves.
  • Hostas are a perfect addition to the rock garden. In time their roots search out available soil. Just give them a little help the first year with some extra waterings.

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Home ] Daylilies ] [ Hostas ] Peonies ] Siberian Iris ] Clematis ] Hardy Ferns ] Books etc. ] How to Order ] About Us ] Sales & Specials ]

Homestead Farms
3701 Highway EE
Owensville, Missouri  65066
Phone or Fax: 573-437-4277
Toll Free: 888-314-3148
E-mail: ronv@fidnet.com
printable order form